Typemock Isolator: A CLR Interception Approach to Unit Testing

Recently I have contacted Typemock and I was offered a license of Typemock Isolator, their flagship tool, in support of my OSS project LINQBridgeVS. Typemock Isolator is a viable tool to incorporate CLR interception for unit testing in .NET.

CLR is the acronym for Common Language Runtime and it is the virtual machine that manages the execution of .NET programs. Typemock Isolator intercepts CLR calls at run-time and offers a fluent API to fake almost anything: static and sealed classes, instances, virtual or non-virtual synchronous and asynchronous methods, P-invoke calls, private and static constructors and also LINQ queries.  Typemock Isolator comes as a Visual Studio extension compatible with Visual Studio from 2010 through 2017 with any .NET Framework version up to 4.7.2 and incorporates four different components: 

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NDepend: A Static Analyser for .NET and .NET Core

NDepend is static analyser for .NET and .NET Core. Recently I was contacted by its creator, Patrick Smacchia, who kindly offered a license in support of my OSS project LINQBridgeVs.

Overview

NDepend is a tool mainly targeted for software architects who want to have a deep insight into their projects. NDepend gathers data from a code base and includes code quality metrics, test coverage statistics, assembly dependencies, evolution and changes, state mutability, usage of tier code, tech debt estimation and more. Another interesting feature is the ability to write custom rules using a domain specific language called CQLinq, which is based on LINQ, C# and the NDepend API.

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Unity (Pre 5.5) Memory Safe Enumerators with C5 Generic Collection Library

DISCLAIMER: The topic treated in this article is only valid for version of Unity up to 5.4

Long time ago I posted an article on how disposable value types were treated in Unity and why they used to generate unnecessary and unwanted garbage. It emerged that in the official Mono compiler as well as in the Microsoft C# compiler (but not in Unity) a violation of the C# specification lead to an optimisation of disposable structs within a using statement. Disposable value types are used in C# mainly to implement iterator blocks, which are used to iterate over collections. Two years ago I  decided to fix this issue by re-implementing the enumerators in a library called C5 which is a project for generic collection classes for C# and other CLI languages. However with the release of Unity 5.5 back in March 2017 version 4.4 of the Mono C# compiler was shipped and finally this issue was properly fixed and became history.

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Unity Mono Runtime – The Truth about Disposable Value Types

When I started making games using Unity, after almost 10 years of C# development, I was very concerned to acknowledge that foreach loops are highly avoided in Unity because they allocate unnecessary memory on the heap. Personally I love the clean syntax of a foreach. It aids readably and clarity and it also increases the abstraction level. However a very clear and neat explanation of the memory issue problem can be found in a blog article posted on Gamasutra by Wendelin Reich.

From Wendelin’s analysis it emerged that the version of the Mono compiler adopted in Unity has a different behaviour from Microsoft implementation. In particular enumerators, which are usually implemented in the .NET framework as mutable value types, are boxed by the compiler, causing an unnecessary generation of garbage. Boxing is the process of converting a value type (allocated on the stack) into a reference type, thus allocating a new instance on the heap. 

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Unity and Reflection – Optimising Memory using Caching on iOS

Introduction

I really love reflection. Reflection is a technique used for obtaining type information at run-time. It’s not only that, with reflection is possible to examine and change information of objects, to generate (technically to emit IL) new classes, methods and so on still at runtime. It’s a powerful technique but it is known, under certain circumstances, for being slow. If you are a game developer and you are targeting mobile devices (iOS or Android for instance) using Unity, you definitely want to preserve your memory and save precious clock cycles. Moreover, with AOT (Ahead of Time compilation)  IL cannot be emitted at run-time as it is pre-generated at compile time. Therefore a large part of reflection, e.g. expression trees, anonymous types etc., is just not available.

The Problem

Recently I have worked on a dynamic prefab serializer and I needed to use reflection to retrieve types from their string representations. In general to retrieve a type in C# you have three options:

  • typeof(MyClass), which is an operator to obtain a type known at compile-time.
  • GetType() is a method you call on individual objects, to get the execution-time type of the object.
  • Type.GetType(“Namespace.MyClass, MyAssembly”) gives you a type from its string representation at runtime.

typeof is converted into a constant at compile time and GetType  returns a reference to the run-time type of your object. But what about Type.GetType(string)???

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Profiling CUDA on Tegra K1 (Shield Tablet)

Recently I have struggled a lot to profile a CUDA application on the Shield Tablet. If you were thinking “What the hell would you need a CUDA app for, on a tablet?” I would understand :D. CUDA it’s not for everyday use but can be very powerful.

As of now (Late 2015), the Shield has the most powerful mobile GPU on the market (Tegra Kepler architecture with 192 streaming processors). I decided to evaluate and profile physics algorithms using such architecture.

Reading through documentations, keynotes from GDC, and presentations I found out that is currently not possible to profile a CUDA application from an APK!

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